Grouse

Included search variations: Grouse, Spruce Grouse

Grouse /ɡraʊs/ are a group of birds from the order Galliformes, in the family Phasianidae. Grouse are frequently assigned to the subfamily Tetraoninae or tribe Tetraonini (formerly the family Tetraonidae), a classification supported by mitochondrial DNA sequence studies,[1] and applied by the American Ornithologists' Union,[2] ITIS,[3] and others.[4] Grouse inhabit temperate and subarctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere, from pine forests to moorland and mountainside,[5] from 83°N (rock ptarmigan in northern Greenland) to 28°N (Attwater's prairie chicken in Texas)

Grouse are heavily built like other Galliformes, such as chickens. They range in length from 31 to 95 cm (12 to 37 in), and in weight from 0.3 to 6.5 kg (0.66 to 14.33 lb). Males are larger than females—twice as heavy in the western capercaillie, the largest member of the family. Grouse have feathered nostrils. Their legs covered in feathers down to the toes, and in winter the toes, too, have feathers or small scales on the sides, an adaptation for walking on snow and burrowing into it for shelter. Unlike other Galliformes, they have no spurs.

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