New Release of Buck Moon | Night Photography

8/25/2020  |  Uinta Mountains, Utah

Introducing my new release 'Buck Moon'! This photograph was taken on July 2, 2020 at 9:30 p.m. and was created by shooting 13 horizontal images and then combining them in Adobe Lightroom and then cropping them to this 2:5 ratio panoramic. This was such a wonderful evening sitting and watching the moon rise over the lake, the fish jump and summer evening unwind in the mountains. There is no place I would rather be than sitting in a place like this. I captured this photograph at Smith and Morehouse Reservoir in the Uinta Mountains. Here is a video of waiting for the moment to take this wonderful photograph.

Limited Edition of 100 Museum Grade, Fine Art Prints.The full moon in July is often called the Buck Moon because early summer...

Buck Moon

Uinta Mountains, UTAH

Limited Edition of 100 Museum Grade, Fine Art Prints.

The full moon in July is often called the Buck Moon because early summer is when the buck deer grow their antlers. This was just a few days before the full moon but I thought the title fit. This isn't far from my wife's family cabin at Smith and Morehouse Reservoir on the Weber River and we love spending time there. This night I set up to photograph the sunset but it was rather lack luster so despite the mosquitoes I convinced my wife to wait until the moon was above the peaks and reflecting on the water, I just love how this turned out. I have always loved the reflection of the moon on the water and seeing it over mountains on a clear night is always spectacular to me. This was such an amazing night and well worth the wait and a few mosquito bites!

I shot 13 horizontal photographs starting at the shoreline and panning upward after each shot to capture this. I then merged them in Adobe Lightroom and cropped the image to this 2:5 ratio panoramic.

"Buck Moon" shown as a 20x50 inch Aluminum Print in Roma, Charcoal Black frame.

Smith and Morehouse Reservoir is in the upper reaches of the Weber River drainage in the western Uinta Mountains, Utah. This area of the Uintas is popular during the summer, as it is relatively close to population centers on the Wasatch Front. It is in a narrow, north-facing canyon that stays cooler and moister than other areas. The reservoir was enlarged in 1987, quintupling its capacity. The shoreline is owned by the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, and public access is unrestricted. In addition to recreation water use is for both irrigation and culinary purposes, with a greater fraction being used for culinary as population increases along the Wasatch Front.

The Uinta Mountains (/juːˈɪntə/ yoo-IN-tə) are an east-west trending chain of mountains in northeastern Utah extending slightly into southern Wyoming in the United States. As a subrange of the Rocky Mountains, they are unusual for being the highest range in the contiguous United States running east to west,[1] and lie approximately 100 miles (160 km) east of Salt Lake City. The range has peaks ranging from 11,000–13,528 feet (3,353–4,123 m), with the highest point being Kings Peak, also the highest point in Utah. The Mirror Lake Highway crosses the western half of the Uintas on its way to Wyoming.